Beyond the baccalaureate: Learning from across the world

In his latest research report Bill Lucas gives an overview of the history of the term baccalaureate and looks at how the rest of the world is responding to changing employment and societal needs.

A number of organisations have recently called for changes to the English 14-19 curriculum, often using the term ‘baccalaureate’ to describe a broader, deeper, more balanced and more holistic approach.

One that better meets the needs of all young people growing up today and better prepares them for life beyond school or college.

In his latest research report Bill Lucas gives an overview of the history of the term baccalaureate and looks at how the rest of the world is responding to changing employment and societal needs.

England, he shows, is very much in the slow lane when it comes to thinking about curriculum reform.

You can read the full report below:

This report is part of a series of papers produced by the Edge Foundation, in collaboration with an expert panel including members of Rethinking Assessment, looking at future ideas for a Baccalaureate style approach to education.

You can find out more on their Bacc to the Drawing Board webpage.

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